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Chicago Medical Malpractice Law Blog

Facility sued for hospital negligence after mom's death

Childbirth should be a celebratory occasion for new parents and extended family members. For the majority of Illinois families and others around the country, this is the case. However, when tragedy occurs, the once-happy event can quickly turn into a dire situation. A woman in another state recently died after delivering her baby. Her family wants to hold the medical center liable for the hospital negligence that contributed to her death and has filed a medical malpractice lawsuit.

A 39-year-old woman went to the hospital for a repeat elective cesarean section delivery shortly after noon on April 12, 2016. The woman's baby boy was born approximately two hours after her arrival. Shortly after the delivery, the woman and baby were bonding in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit. However, court documents state that urine was detected in the woman's catheter near 5 p.m. Around 11:30 p.m., there was concern that the woman had active internal bleeding.

Multi-million dollar settlement for infant's birth injuries

Childbirth is an exciting event anticipated by hundreds of expectant parents in Illinois and elsewhere every day. However, the joy of a birth can quickly turn to fear and sadness when complications arise in the delivery process. A couple in another state experienced a devastating outcome when their doctor left the delivery room for an extended period of time, resulting in severe birth injuries to their newborn son.

A 19-year-old woman had gone through a normal pregnancy and was in the process of delivering her baby. However, the baby was born with limp limbs and was blue in the face. It was necessary for a medical team to revive the infant, who had severe brain damage from the lack of oxygen. According to a lawsuit filed by the couple, the doctors had failed to perform a cesarean section and had left the expectant mother's room for 8 minutes for a phone call with his stockbroker.

Alleged surgical negligence robs patient of healthy kidney

Illinois residents may be aware that statistics indicate that one of the most common surgical errors is the removal of the wrong body part. It would only be logical to ask how that can happen. However, a civil lawsuit that was recently filed in another state explains how error upon error, along with alleged surgical negligence, led to the removal of a patient's healthy left kidney instead of a softball-sized tumor that was attached to his right kidney.

The lawsuit refers to the non-emergency surgical procedure that was ordered for an 83-year-old patient to remove only a life-threatening cancerous tumor from his healthy right kidney -- leaving the healthy organ in place. However, despite adequate documentation provided to the surgical team, the surgeons allegedly removed the man's healthy left kidney. These documents included three different diagnoses along with the first referral, faxed referral, clinical notes and medical charts, indicating the required surgery to the right kidney.

Hospital surgical errors: Foreign object in body after procedure

Thousands of surgeries are performed in Illinois and throughout the country every day. The majority of these operations are conducted without incident, and patients quickly begin the healing or rehabilitation process. However, surgical errors may result in serious complications to a patient. This negligence from a medical team can cause catastrophic repercussions.

Recently, a hospital in another state was fined for leaving a foreign object inside a patient after surgery. In April 2014, a man had gone into a hospital for an operation. Rather than feeling better after the surgery, he stated that he had lost a significant amount of weight, had no energy and felt like he might die, according to a statement from the state's Department of Public Health.

SCOTUS rejects GM's ignition switch appeal

The Supreme Court recently rejected General Motors Co.'s appeal seeking to block some lawsuits related to defective ignition switches in its vehicles. The justices upheld a federal appeals court ruling from last year that the company's 2009 bankruptcy does not shield it from liability for injuries and deaths that occurred pre-bankruptcy because GM knew about the problem and kept it secret from the public for over a decade.

SCOTUS rejects GM's ignition switch appeal

The Supreme Court recently rejected General Motors Co.'s appeal seeking to block some lawsuits related to defective ignition switches in its vehicles. The justices upheld a federal appeals court ruling from last year that the company's 2009 bankruptcy does not shield it from liability for injuries and deaths that occurred pre-bankruptcy because GM knew about the problem and kept it secret from the public for over a decade.

Lawsuit filed over hospital's failure to diagnose man's condition

Hospitals in Illinois and throughout the country routinely make errors in their care of patients. In most situations, these errors are reparable and patients recover and may even be unaware something amiss occurred. However, some errors by medical providers can prove fatal. The survivors of a man who passed away last year have recently sued a hospital, other medical groups and physicians in another state for failure to diagnose his condition.

A 43-year-old man died from a rare flesh-eating bacterial infection called necrotizing fasciitis, a disease that destroys soft tissue under the skin. The man initially went to a medical clinic with a fever and other symptoms, including a headache, cough, body aches and congestion. He tested negative for the flu and strep and was sent home with a prescription of Tamiflu. The man went to the emergency department of a hospital three days later with complaints of intense pain and swelling in his leg. He was diagnosed with deep-vein thrombosis and flu-like symptoms, and he was discharged with an anti-coagulant medication.

Errors in electronic health records from hospital negligence

Electronic health records are becoming more common in Illinois and across the country as many hospitals have begun using technology instead of traditional paper for patient information. However, health systems in another state have actually attributed some hospital errors to the new technology. While no deaths were recorded, hospital negligence was reported as the cause of several missed dosages or incorrect administration of medication.

An independent patient safety agency has recently looked for opportunities to decrease errors in electronic records. Experts contend that patients are as safe as when paper records were used. Nevertheless, they acknowledge the existence of problems unique to technology, such as operator errors or system problems.

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