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Patient claims surgical errors led to additional surgeries

On Behalf of | Dec 31, 2015 | Surgical Errors |

An Illinois man underwent surgery to have his gallbladder removed back in Sept. 2015. Afterward, it became clear to him that some surgical errors had occurred because he was in serious physical pain and required further medical treatment. Therefore, he filed a medical malpractice suit against the surgeon and others.

The man claims that during the procedure, the surgeon accidentally severed his common bile duct. Apparently, this is not uncommon. However, most surgeons fix the problem during the same procedure. Otherwise, the flow of bile can be blocked or bile can leak into the patient’s abdomen. Either of these events can have serious or deadly health consequences.

The surgeon who performed this man’s gallbladder removal allegedly failed to correct the problem. This led to additional surgical procedures to fix the duct. In the meantime, the man suffered physical and mental pain and incurred medical expenses, along with other damages. The symptoms of a bile duct problem include fever, vomiting and abdominal swelling, along with other symptoms that make an individual uncomfortable. These symptoms should not be taken lightly if there is any chance that it could be an issue with a bile duct.

If an Illinois resident is suffering from these symptoms after a surgical procedure, it is possible that it is the result of surgical errors. A thorough examination, review of the medical records and investigation might reveal that a medical malpractice claim is appropriate. If the evidence establishes negligence, the court may award damages that could defray the cost of current and future medical expenses, along with other damages consistent with the specific circumstances.

Source: Orland Park Il. Patch, “Man Sues Orland Park Surgeon for Medical Malpractice“, Brendan Krisel, Dec. 31, 2015